09 Aug

How Plants Help the Environment


Humans need plants for survival, but we also need them for their basis in the long-term health and sustainability of our environmental systems. Plants improve the environment in many ways, like releasing oxygen into the atmosphere, absorbing carbon dioxide, providing nutrients to animals, and regulating the water cycle — all things we need to sustain life on Earth.

20 May

The Mighty Worker: 3 Ways to Save Bees from Extinction


A world without bees would not be as sweet. Honey, wax, propolis, royal jelly, pollen, and even bee venom would not exist in the place we call home. Today, on World Bee Day, we celebrate and honor the tiny, but mighty workers who help to improve our environment and acknowledge how important it is to ensure they stay alive.

09 Dec

Meet Bagasse, The Super Hero of Sustainable Packaging


If you’ve gone for takeout recently and received your food in cardboard-like takeout boxes, then you may have met “bagasse” in real life. Many eco-friendly restaurants and companies are prioritizing sustainability within their single-use containers, choosing packaging that is made from environmentally-friendly materials. While bamboo is well-known for eco-friendly packages, bagasse is a lesser-known material.

03 Feb

Working From Home Sustainably


Sustainability starts at home. With more and more of us working from home, now is as good an opportunity as ever to improve sustainability habits. 

Smarter Lighting

Harsh artificial lighting is one of the worst parts of working in an office — so why reproduce that at home? Save energy by positioning your desk near a sunny window and turning down the lights around your house. This study found that natural sunlight improves employee mood and productivity — aka energy-saving efforts plus an added boost to productivity. 

03 Feb

A Mountain Gorilla’s Journey Through Climate Change


Amongst the mountains and the deep green forests of central Africa lives the stoic mountain gorilla. Standing between 4 and 6 feet tall, weighing between 300 and 500 pounds, and covered in hair from head to toe, these gentle mammals form bands or troops for community living. Each troop covers an area of .75 to 16 square miles, and an adult gorilla can eat up to 39-44 pounds of vegetation in a day. These gentle giants spend most of their day eating while occasionally playing with their babies.

03 Feb

The Possibility of Future, Smog-Eating Buildings


As climate change increasingly becomes a problem, the world’s greatest minds are seeking creative solutions to clean our earth’s air. Some environmental scientists, architects, and designers are analyzing buildings to determine how to effectively use them for passively cleaning smoggy urban air.

03 Feb

Diminish Air Pollution


Climate change has brought a magnifying glass to the global problem of air pollution. As we build, create, and manufacture, our machines release toxic chemicals into the air that cause smog and other forms of pollution.

Air Pollution

Fossil fuels emit harmful chemicals that can cause serious problems for the environment and people’s health. Greenhouse gas emissions come from the use of fuels such as natural gas, coal, wood, and petroleum.

03 Feb

How to Dispose of Bioplastics


Learning to dispose of bioplastics appropriately is crucial to optimizing all of the benefits of using bioplastics opposed to using regular plastic items. Bioplastics are meant to be better for the environment while still retaining the reliability and durability of plastic because they are able to decompose faster and better than regular plastic. However, bioplastics still only dispose well under the right conditions.  

03 Feb

An Australian Quoll’s Journey Through Climate Change


Sleeping through the day and active at night, the Australian quoll is a sleek animal with a cat-like body, a mouse-shaped face, lemur-like ears, and white polka-dotted fur. The quoll has approximately six species that vary in weight and sizes, from 11 ounces to 15 pounds. As a carnivorous marsupial, the quoll forages for food at night and avoids the toxic cane toads like the plague.

03 Feb

A Giraffe's Journey Through Climate Change


Gracefully statuesque with muscular shoulders and a long, arching neck, giraffes roam the African savanna, grazing from the treetops. Their legs are often longer than 6 feet, and they can reach speeds of 35 miles per hour for short distances. These tall creatures with goofy faces, long purple tongues, and an array of individual spotting patterns flaunt two horns alongside their ears that mimics a crown. Needing about 5-30 minutes of sleep per 24-hour period and requiring a sip of water every few days, giraffes are basically superbeings.