28 Feb

An Australian Quoll’s Journey Through Climate Change


Sleeping through the day and active at night, the Australian quoll is a sleek animal with a cat-like body, a mouse-shaped face, lemur-like ears, and white polka-dotted fur. The quoll has approximately six species that vary in weight and sizes, from 11 ounces to 15 pounds. As a carnivorous marsupial, the quoll forages for food at night and avoids the toxic cane toads like the plague.

28 Nov

A Giraffe's Journey Through Climate Change


Gracefully statuesque with muscular shoulders and a long, arching neck, giraffes roam the African savanna, grazing from the treetops. Their legs are often longer than 6 feet, and they can reach speeds of 35 miles per hour for short distances. These tall creatures with goofy faces, long purple tongues, and an array of individual spotting patterns flaunt two horns alongside their ears that mimics a crown. Needing about 5-30 minutes of sleep per 24-hour period and requiring a sip of water every few days, giraffes are basically superbeings.

29 Jun

A Whale's Journey Through Climate Change


Hidden behind the dense curtain of the ocean water and singing an eerie song of their own, whales are the gentle giants of the deepest depths. Whales are built similarly to the Hippopotamus and are warm-blooded with a layer of blubber to help insulate and moderate body temperature. Large flippers allow them to navigate the ocean currents, and their blowholes on the top of their head allow a quick breath before diving again. Some whales can hold their breath for up to 90 minutes.